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Advice

Fresh Breath

Did you know that approximately 30% of the population have chronic bad breath and 70% of the population notice it on other people.

Contrary to popular opinion, the majority of cases of bad breath begin in the mouth and not in the stomach.  Around 80% of bad breath is caused by gases given off by bad bacteria involved in gum disease.

Causes of bad breath in the mouth:

  • Poor oral hygiene
  • Gingivitis / Periodontitis
  • Ill fitting crowns, poor designed bridgework
  • Cracked, leaking and over hanging fillings
  • Poorly cleaned dentures
  • Other causes can include food, drink, fasting, smoking, and general morning mouth.

Periodontal Disease

What is Gum Disease, or Periodontal Infection?

Periodontal Disease (also known as “Periodontal Infection”, “Gum Disease” or Pyorrhea”) is an ongoing bacterial infection in the gums and bone which support your teeth. If not treated, this ongoing infection can destroy the bone around your teeth resulting in tooth loss. 75% of all adult tooth loss is due to Periodontal Infection.

How Does An “Ongoing Infection” Work?

When you were a child, did you ever get a bad scrape that got all red and swollen? That was bacteria that got under your skin and caused an infection. It may have lasted for days or weeks. Finally your immune system conquered the bad bacteria and the infection healed. With an ONGOING infection, your immune system never wins the battle and the infection grows. Periodontal Disease is an ongoing infection in the pockets around your teeth. Your immune system is losing the battle and, without treatment, it will get worse.

What Can Cause a “Burst” of Infection Activity?

People with Periodontal Disease have low resistance to periodontal bacteria. This causes a continuing gum infection with grows in “bursts” of activity. Each time it grows, more support for your teeth is lost. Some factors which can cause a “burst” of activity are:

  • Poor Oral Hygiene
  • Dental Plaque
  • Smoking
  • Genetic Factors
  • Stress Or Tension
  • Diet
  • Age

Illness 

Read more Patient Advice

Fresh Breath

Did you know that approximately 30% of the population have chronic bad breath and 70% of the population notice it on other people.

Contrary to popular opinion, the majority of cases of bad breath begin in the mouth and not in the stomach.  Around 80% of bad breath is caused by gases given off by bad bacteria involved in gum disease.

Causes of bad breath in the mouth:

  • Poor oral hygiene
  • Gingivitis / Periodontitis
  • Ill fitting crowns, poor designed bridgework
  • Cracked, leaking and over hanging fillings
  • Poorly cleaned dentures
  • Other causes can include food, drink, fasting, smoking, and general morning mouth.

Periodontal Disease

What is Gum Disease, or Periodontal Infection?

Periodontal Disease (also known as “Periodontal Infection”, “Gum Disease” or Pyorrhea”) is an ongoing bacterial infection in the gums and bone which support your teeth. If not treated, this ongoing infection can destroy the bone around your teeth resulting in tooth loss. 75% of all adult tooth loss is due to Periodontal Infection.

How Does An “Ongoing Infection” Work?

When you were a child, did you ever get a bad scrape that got all red and swollen? That was bacteria that got under your skin and caused an infection. It may have lasted for days or weeks. Finally your immune system conquered the bad bacteria and the infection healed. With an ONGOING infection, your immune system never wins the battle and the infection grows. Periodontal Disease is an ongoing infection in the pockets around your teeth. Your immune system is losing the battle and, without treatment, it will get worse.

What Can Cause a “Burst” of Infection Activity?

People with Periodontal Disease have low resistance to periodontal bacteria. This causes a continuing gum infection with grows in “bursts” of activity. Each time it grows, more support for your teeth is lost. Some factors which can cause a “burst” of activity are:

  • Poor Oral Hygiene
  • Dental Plaque
  • Smoking
  • Genetic Factors
  • Stress Or Tension
  • Diet
  • Age

Illness